Description

The Book of Yonis is an unflinching exploration of the beautiful diversity of female genitalia, free of judgement, shame and embarrassment.

Fifty everyday women posed for up close and personal photographs that show their genitals from many different and rarely seen angles. Each women also wrote candidly with wit, wisdom, passion, and even despair, about her relationship with her vulva.

The book is designed to challenge the way society views women’s genitals and sexuality in a way that also celebrates the beauty and power each of us carry with us.

Heart of the Flower is a beautiful gift or addition to your bookcase and the perfect way to acknowledge that heart of the flower that is woman.

The book has also given me greater insight into my own situation; I think a lot of women will benefit from reading your book, and also men should read it as well! I am very glad I bought it finally and it has really opened my mind to how different men and women’s relationship is with their yoni/lingam.
– Brad

Just in these last two days I have given my own yoni more attention and loving thoughts than I ever have and am finally seeing that part of me as a place of beauty instead of a functional part of my anatomy. What a gift. Thank you!
– Natarsha


Wholesale info for Book
Just as Heart of the Flower serves as a catalyst to open communication to what may difficult conversations between parents and their growing children at the appropriate time.

She’s an invaluable book for professionals working with men and women where issues of sexuality, body image, and past trauma may be being discussed.

Please contact for wholesale prices.

From the professionals

In Westernised societies, amidst other forms of female genital cosmetic surgery, the uptake of labia reduction surgery is especially on the increase. There is no reason to suppose that the labia minora have become larger or more prone to diseases in recent years. Neither is there any evidence that surgery is being carried out to address recognised pathology. Rather, there is every reason to believe that the increasing prevalence of surgery has something do with women and girls’ increasing dissatisfaction with their genitalia. The hairless, smooth and tucked-in female genital appearance is being aggressively promoted. That many healthy women and girls believe their genitals to be ‘abnormal’ and require surgical ‘correction’ should come as no surprise. The infantilising aesthetic grossly distorts the reality of wide variations in adult female genital configurations -variations that are faithfully portrayed in the Book of Yonis.

I hope that women and their partners and care providers will consult this resource for information and inspiration.
– Dr Lih-Mei Liao, Consultant Clinical Psychologist, UK